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Breathing easier with digitally-enabled asthma support: Clare’s story

“It just works so much better for me” – new video shows the power of digital innovation to support people living with asthma.

Patients with asthma in Nottinghamshire are using digital technology as part of a pilot project, to better manage and monitor their condition from the comfort of their home.

Nurses from the King’s Medical Centre in Sutton-In-Ashfield are leading the way, supporting patients to take control of their asthma using technology-enabled remote monitoring and digital self-management plans.

Clare, 51, uses a peak flow device to measure the amount of air flowing in and out of her lungs. She records this information daily on her digital personal health record, which can also be seen and monitored remotely by her nursing team. Clare said: “Asthma affects every area of my life but I can see with my peak flow readings whether my breathing is improving or getting worse.”

Respiratory Nurse Specialist, Heidi Swift, adds: “The pilot demonstrates that providing every patient with access to monitor their asthma reduces admission rates, prevents deterioration, keeps them at work and allows them to function at home.”

“I’ve got all the information I need to help manage my condition and it just works so much better for me. I have also been able to take up swimming, which is something I would never have dreamed about before.”

Notts Asthma Project - Sarah Coupe Kings Medical Centre

 

The project aims to address health inequalities for those diagnosed with asthma. Nicola Graham, Senior Commissioning and Transformation Manager at Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Integrated Care System (ICS), suggests: “Embedding a digital self-management plan and doing regular peak flows, means patients can spot the early warning signs of a change in their condition. It means NHS staff can take any action needed, like a change in medication or the treatment plan.”

For patients like Clare, this support can be life changing.

 

She said: “I’ve got all the information I need to help manage my condition and it just works so much better for me. I have also been able to take up swimming, which is something I would never have dreamed about before.”

 

Clare’s story is now the focus of a new video commissioned by the NHS National Innovation Collaborative for digital health. It features the team behind the project – a partnership between Nottinghamshire health and care colleagues from primary care, community teams, the Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Integrated Care System (ICS) and its digital transformation arm, Digital Notts.

The video features four nurses central to the project; Lead Practice Nurse, Sara-Louise Smith and Practice Nurse, Sarah Coupe from King’s Medical Centre, and Respiratory Nurse Specialists, Heidi Swift and Sarah Tweddle from Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust. The asthma project is part of the Public-Facing Digital Services programme led by Digital Notts and the ICS.

The NHS National Innovation Collaborative for digital health is a learning and support network for health and care professionals across the country who are delivering local technology-enabled services to support people at home and in the community.

Health and care professionals are encouraged to join the Collaborative to access inspirational shared learning resources created in partnership with local organisations like the Nottinghamshire team. To request to join visit: http://future.nhs.uk/InnovationCollaborative.

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